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The Squirt Report (Part 2): Take it from the Professionals?

In our recent survey on female ejaculation, we asked several pointed questions about how porn influences people’s understanding of female ejaculation. (Whether porn has assisted people in achieving female ejaculation is a whole other topic, but our previous post on this survey would suggest it has helped at least a few.) Let’s see what we’ve learned from the “pros,” shall we?

I Know It When I See It

The first line of business, of course, is to establish how common squirting is in porn as a whole. While there aren’t any statistics to cite regarding the number of gushes per minute of video in the endless library of professionally produced porn (let alone amateur and live-cam), we do know how many of our responders have actually seen squirting porn: sixty-four percent, whereas only thirty-six percent have never seen it. Of course, we have no way of knowing how much porn in general the respondents regularly consume. Still, it’s safe to say that squirting porn is common and widely available. That’s not proof that female-ejaculation is real. It’s mighty suggestive, though.

Let the Skeptics Arise

Oddly enough, although over six hundred people responded that they have seen squirting porn, less than four hundred people who believe in the validity of female ejaculation cite squirting porn as a reason for their belief. This statistic doesn’t really tell us much about female ejaculation as a scientifically proven occurrence, but it does say quite a bit about the merit most viewers give to porn as a realistic portrayal of true sexual experience. So, how much trust do most people give the professionals?

You Had One Job

It turns out, not as much as you’d think. Of our respondents, only ten percent believe that squirting porn is always real. Forty-seven percent think it is sometimes real, twelve percent think it’s never real, and a whopping thirty-one percent don’t know one way or the other. In other words, when it comes to female ejaculation, the jury is out on whether or not we can trust the professional squirters. This has to make them feel pretty bad, right?

Probably not.

In fact, based on this video, even porn stars aren’t sure if female ejaculation is real or fake!

If you can’t trust the pros, who can you trust? (That question is dripping with sarcasm.)

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The Squirt Report (Part 1): Where Do You Fit In?

femaleejaculationAs many of you know, we recently fielded a survey on female ejaculation. We’ve gotten over 1,400 responses so far, enough to be able to claim a reasonable amount of statistical significance for our data.*

Here’s our first report about our findings.

How Often Do Squirters Squirt?

For most gushers, whether or not they’ll ejaculate is unpredictable. Five percent of gushers say they “always” ejaculate. Twenty-seven percent “usually” squirt, 42% say sometimes, and 22% “rarely.”

(Three percent of respondents who said they female-ejaculate responded ‘never’ to this question. Contradictory, right? Our comments section suggests that most of these folks had one squirting experience in their lives, then never again.)

They Get By With Some Help From Their Friends

Fifty-three percent of gushers say they’re likelier to squirt when they’re having partnered sex. Twenty-one percent say it’s more likely when they’re playing solo, and 26% say the likelihood is about the same.

Hey—what are friends for?

splashing-164171_1280Get Out the Puddle Pads!

When asked how much they gush, our respondents’ answers were all over the place. (Like the female ejaculate, maybe.)

Only 1% said they emit “a few drops.” Eleven percent said a “small amount.” “More than a little, less than a lot” came in at 23% and “I’m a super-soaker” registered at 31%.

“Varies” was the highest number of all—34%.

Bottom line, when women squirt, they tend to produce a lot of liquid. The amount tends to be unpredictable, though. Many women produce more on one occasion, less on another.

A Learnable Skill!

About 50% of squirters learned how to do so. (Seven percent of all squirters said they learned with a teacher, 25% with a partner, and 17% taught themselves.)

Fourteen percent of squirters said they’d always been able to do so. Fifty percent of respondents said they developed the ability spontaneously as they grew into their sexuality.

(Total percentages exceed 100% because multiple answers were permitted.)

At Any Age!

Two percent of gushers report having the ability as pre-teens. Three percent learned how to gush when they were over 60. Over 50% of all gushers learned to squirt when they were thirty or older.

The moral: It’s never too late!

Everyone’s Experience Is Different

prt_500x500_1418345679_2x-by-by-folkert-gorterLet’s close with some quotes about gushers’ personal experience:

  • “It was something I taught myself at age 11 through intuition. However, as I have gotten older, it has been more difficult to quiet my mind and let stress fall away. Due to this, squirting happens much less frequently.”
  • “It just happened spontaneously after trying to learn it. The moment I let it go proverbially, I let it go literally.”
  • “I started gushing when I married my husband last year. It’s very emotional for me. I need to feel really loved and wanted or it doesn’t happen.”

Do any of these comments ring true for you? Where do you fit in?

*An important note: Our sample is neither random nor a cross-section of the population. Many of our respondents came from our own list or from similar communities of sexually savvy people. That being said, we view the findings as strongly suggestive—and totally interesting.

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The Joy of Squirting: How I Learned to Be a Juicy Goddess

The_Birth_of_Venus_by_Robert_Fowler-soft_edgesThe Joy of Squirting—How I Learned to Be a Juicy Goddess

Whether you call it squirting, gushing, or female ejaculation, it’s a delicious form of hot wet pleasure. Releasing this fluid, also called amrita, the nectar of life, is truly an ecstatic experience. Here’s how I learned to go from orgasmic to a gushing goddess—and you can, too.

Female What?

When I first heard about female ejaculation (FE), I was already working as a nurse-midwife and gynecology practitioner. I had never experienced it myself. At first, I thought it was made-up porn nonsense. But over the next few years, I had patients who reported what sounded like FE: profuse release of fluid with high-level arousal and/or orgasm. This is when I began to suspect that gushing was a real but rare experience.

She Gushed On Me!

In the mid 90’s, I had an up-close personal experience of squirting with a female partner who was an ejaculator. She told me she had always ‘gushed’ with orgasm. The amount was profuse. I observed the fluid spurting out of her urethra. It did not smell like urine, wasn’t yellow, and it tasted briny and tangy but not at all like pee. It didn’t leave any stain on a white towel. When air-dried, the fragrance on the towel was quite pleasant.

As I’d been having orgasms for almost 30 years without such a response myself, I assumed it was something only a small number of women had the natural ability to do. I now ‘believed’ in FE, as an uncommon but natural ability.

Female Ejaculation Lessons?

My next shift in thinking came when I met a number of women who said that they had learned to squirt, commonly in their late 30’s and 40’s. This certainly got my interest! I started to believe that gushing might be a learnable skill.

I already knew that many sexual responses were based on skills that were learnable. I’d taught myself a variety of useful skills such as how to have assured orgasms, orgasms from intercourse, non-genital orgasms, and so on. Once I realized that female ejaculation was a skill that could be acquired, I figured that if these other women had learned to ejaculate, so could I. At that time, though, there were no books or classes on the topic, so I just kept asking questions when I had the opportunity while also expanding my orgasm skills and holding on to the vision that it was possible for me to experience squirting myself.

Squirting Is Possible and Learnable

Sure enough, now that I knew it was possible and learnable, and also had a foundation of orgasmic proficiency, it happened. After a delightful night of extensive stimulation and dozens of orgasms, I experienced my own dramatic gushing mega-orgasm. It was profuse, wildly expanded my already pretty wild orgasms, and had a component that felt deeply sacred and empowering. I was now a true believer. No question about it—squirting was a learnable skill!

Over the next few years, I became more proficient at having a wide spectrum of orgasms, including gushing ones. I was reinforced in my basic belief that if a person combined comfort and connection to their body, knowledge, skill and practice, they could learn to squirt.

Gushing Variety

The nature of my gushing varies quite a bit. I can produce vastly different amounts of fluid. With certain types of stimulation, especially if it’s prolonged, I may gush buckets. If I’m not in a deep state of arousal, inadequately stimulated or dehydrated, I produce very little. Not all my orgasms include obvious gushing at all.

I’m certain that I’m not producing pee. When I gush, the fluid I produce smells remarkably like amniotic fluid, briny and fresh like seawater. When I was still in my cycling years, it would be sweeter around ovulation. While it does emerge from the urethral opening, it’s not yellow and doesn’t smell like urine. I’ve checked the pH and it isn’t the same as urine.

Another consideration for me is that I can produce considerably more ejaculatory fluid than I can urine. When I pee, a finite amount of urine comes out. It takes some time before I can generate more. In a really prolonged orgasmic series of ejaculations, I can produce huge amounts of fluid. As long as I’m well hydrated, I can keep going. I measured the fluid once and found that I can expel about ½ cup with each series of gushes—and then keep going to have many additional series of gushes of similar amounts. I could never produce that much urine in such a short amount of time.

The Anatomy of Female Ejaculation

As I was developing my gushing abilities, I became intensely interested in the anatomy and physiology of the process. Since it was clear to me that it was not urine, diluted or otherwise, I wondered where the fluid came from. For a while, I found no plausible explanations for it. The scientific perspective seemed to be that it must be urine since there appeared to be no other place for a large amount of fluid to come from other than the bladder.

I did not (and do not) accept that theory. It was not congruent with my personal experience. I believed there must be another anatomically accurate and scientifically valid explanation.

Ejaculatory Eureka

My ‘aha’ insight into the possible mechanism of female ejaculation followed. You can hear about my ‘Eureka’ moment and find out where all that liquid comes from in my recorded online course The Learnable Art of Female Ejaculation. You can also get all of my subsequent learning about FE such as why we squirt and, of course, lots of tips and techniques for facilitating gushing goddess orgasms for yourself or your partners.

I have no doubt that many of the factors that contribute to the ability to squirt are learnable. These include getting to deep levels of arousal, orgasmic expansion skills, how to relax, release and expel, the mindset of permission, an accurate understanding of the relevant anatomy and specific manual stimulation skills. When women develop these skill sets, it increases the likelihood that they’ll have sexual experiences that are deeply satisfying and orgasmic, whether you discover the ability to get super juicy or not. If women also develop the ability to have glorious gushing orgasms, all the better!

Orgasmic Options

In my teaching about sexuality, I always emphasize that there are a wide range of pleasure pathways and many ways to access deep wells of ecstatic experience. Female ejaculation is not required to have extraordinary pleasure or to be sexy or for any reason other than that it’s a blissful way to expand the menu of orgasmic options.

Pouring forth amrita feels awesome, empowering and profoundly liberating. It taps into deep emotions and feelings of connectedness with yourself, your partners and the universe. It produces a sense of deep release and post-orgasmic relaxation. When you’re gushing you feel like a goddess (or in the presence of one)—beautiful, gorgeous, and wild.


ROLC_FE_March 2016_V4-HeaderGo here for more information about the recorded online course The Learnable Art of Female Ejaculation. For all genders.

 

Why Learn to Squirt? The Pleasures of Female Ejaculation

JP1847Why Learn to Squirt?

The Pleasures of Female Ejaculation!

Whenever I talk to a group of people about female ejaculation, someone invariably asks, “Why would I want to learn how to gush?”

It’s a fair question. For a lot of people, squirting conjures images of mess—a flood at best, pee at worst. It makes sense to wonder, ‘Why bother?’ Or even to have a ‘yuck’ response. Who needs more laundry to do?

So let me tell you—it’s worth it. Believe me, it’s worth it!

Simply put, female ejaculating wildly expands the experience of orgasm. Each spurt of hot fluid brings a delicious and intense feeling of release. It’s a form of ecstatic liberation. When it’s happening, I feel like a goddess—powerful, ecstatic and beautiful. It’s like you’re connected to the universal life force and it’s flowing through you.

It also has a deep emotional component for me. I feel like a fountain of love juice. “The fountain of the goddess,” they call it—for a reason. This is only my experience, of course, but other female ejaculators describe gushing similarly.

It’s also fabulous to be with a gushing goddess. In a recent class, my partner Carl was asked the benefits of being with a female ejaculator. His answer: “It tastes delicious, it’s emotionally empowering, and it feels yummily squishy. It gives me immediate feedback that I’m giving my partner amazing pleasure. There’s nothing better!”

In ancient India, this fluid was called amrita, the nectar of life. It was collected in sacred rituals and used as a blessing. I totally get that—amrita feels blessed to give and to receive!

Female ejaculation—it’s a complete win-win!

It goes without saying that you can have fabulous sex and wonderful orgasms without gushing. As an enhancement, though, there’s nothing quite like it. Female ejaculation feels amazing (sacredly amazing!). It taps into deep wells of emotion. It feels profound, like a delirious, wild, primal force that erupts and spills you into a state of blessed-out bliss.

If it leaves you with some extra laundry, that’s a small price to pay for a ‘fountain-load’ of ecstasy.


To learn how to facilitate your hot wet pleasure, ‘attend’ my recorded online course The Learnable Art of Female Ejaculation. 

ROLC_FE_March 2016_V4-Header

You get three class sessions, special yummy home play assignments, resources and more. For all genders!

 


“What Is Squirting Video” Gets It So Wrong!

Wow, do they get so so many things wrong in this video. I’ll try to be brief but thorough in clearing up the massive misinformation in this: What Is Squirting Video

cappiello-vittel-regime-1911-france-woman-waterfall-trickleIt’s All the Same

I’ll start with their basic premise. They claim that ‘female ejaculation’ and “squirting” are two different processes. I totally disagree! The only difference is in how much fluid is produced. A few tiny drops, small dribbles, big gushes, or huge fountains, it’s the same fluid, just more more or less, either more concentrated or more dilute.

Bad Science

Next, let me briefly address the recent study they refer to. I believe it has a variety of flaws most especially their methods of assessment, their stimulation and measurement techniques as well as a statistically insignificant sample size. I do not consider this study to be good or accurate science.

To the point made in the video about the study showing the subjects having an empty bladder post-ejaculation, I say that data is not borne out in real life. Anecdotally, I and many other women report that after having profuse ejaculation we have then gone to the bathroom and had an abundant amount of urine. If I squirted all my pee out with ejaculation, how would I still have a full bladder needing to be emptied afterward?

All Women Can Learn to Squirt

The video also refers to the idea that only some women ejaculate. I disagree. All women have the equipment to FE. Female ejaculation (whether small squirts or a generous series of giant gushes) is a learnable skill (much like female orgasm itself.) Women can learn to ejaculate with information, support and encourage. And, I most certainly encourage it! Female ejaculation, when done in concert with orgasm (which I heartily recommend) it is an awesome, expanded, emotional and often full-body experience. I encourage women to add squirting to their orgasmic repertoire (you’ll be glad you did)!

vienna-434519Demystifying The Fluid & It’s Source

Let me give you a bit more information about the fluid. It’s produced by the paraurethral glands and is released via tiny ducts into the urethra. From there it can emerge via the urethral opening or be retained and held in the bladder until the next urination.

The paraurethral glands are surrounded by the erectile tissue of the urethral sponge. (Commonly, but incorrectly named the g-spot.) The more stimulation that the sponge gets, the more engorged it becomes, as the erectile capillaries fill with blood. The fluid part of the blood diffuses through the capillary wall and enters glandular tubules. There it mix with the glandular products. Engorgement of the urethral sponge’s erectile tissue causes more fluid to fill the glands, leading to more profuse ejaculation.

Their claim that FE is a small amount of liquid that occurs solely in the vagina is incorrect. The fluid does come from the female prostate (AKA the urethral sponge). But it is not vaginal lubrication nor does it come from the vagina. As noted above, it comes from the paraurethral glands and they empty into the urethra.

It’s NOT Pee

They claim that “squirting is diluted pee”. Studies of female ejaculate (of which there are few) have documented that the fluid produced does not contain significant amounts of urea and nitrate (major components of urine) and that it does contain Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA is also produced by the male prostate.) If you are a woman who ejaculates or you have a partner that does, this claim can be easily checked in the laboratory of your bedroom with the fine sensing equipment of your own nose, eyes and mouth. It’s not yellow. It doesn’t smell like pee. It has a distinct non-urinary flavor.

Stimulating the so-called g-spot (which is actually the underside of the urethral sponge) certainly encourages FE because stimulation causes the erectile tissue to swell. But that doesn’t “put pressure on the urethra, opening the angle between the urethra and bladder making it easier to pee.” Anyone who has experience engorged erectile tissue around their urethra (male or female) knows that that makes it harder to urinate.

artist-making-natural-artAmrita By Any Other Name

Amrita is what this fluid was called in the Sanskrit by practitioners of the ancient practice of Tantra, where it was recognized as sacred. Whether we call it amrita or female ejaculate, whether we squirt, gush, or dribble—it’s all the same thing. A natural, learnable and intensely pleasurable experience that all women can have.

Become Your Own Expert

Check it out for yourselves, become your own experts and then it will be easy to disregard bad science, ignore confused experts and discount video’s like this one that are mostly, just plain wrong. Except that last little line—it is completely natural! Squirting happens!


You want MORE?
For more information about female ejaculation, watch the online class: The Fountain of the Goddess: the Learnable Art of Female Ejaculation.

Or read my award-winning book, Women’s Anatomy of Arousal: Secret Maps to Buried Pleasure to discover more about female anatomy and pleasure than you ever dreamed possible!

 

Circumcision Doesn’t Cause Women’s UTIs. What Does?

Is Circumcision A Factor in Women’s Urinary Tract Infections?
Is Sex?

Claus Rebler-Scream-UTII started writing this as a response to a Facebook post about a women who doesn’t want to have sex with her uncircumcised partner as she believed his intact penis was causing her to get recurrent urinary tract infections. I don’t know if she wants him to get circumcised but that won’t solve her problem. She has my sympathies—urinary tract infections are painful and their association with sex is distressing. Unfortunately, few people seem to actually understand why they occur or how to prevent them.

To start with since the instigation of this post focused on the status of the male member, let me say clearly—whether a male partner is circumcised or intact is not a factor in UTIs.

Sex Is NOT The Cause of Urinary Tract Infections

UTI’s are almost exclusivity caused by anal bacteria that enter and proliferate in the urinary tract. How do the little buggers get from the butt to the urethra? We transport them there by ourselves or with the help of our sexual partners. So, while sex doesn’t cause UTIs, it does tend to transfer the bacteria where they don’t belong.

Prevention

The most important thing to prevent urinary tract infections is super-great sexual hygiene to prevent any bacteria from getting in at all.

Sexual hygiene starts with the basics of good hand, genital and butt washing prior to sexual activities.

However, it’s not our before-sex behavior that’s the main problem. It’s what we’re doing while we have our erotic romps that’s really at fault. The most significant UTI prevention strategy is to keep the butt bacteria where they belong! Take care during sex! Nothing that enters in or touches near the anus should then touch in or near the vulva, vagina and urethral opening.

24969142975_bebcb585bb_zSex—It’s Messy!

Let’s face it—sex is often a wet, messy business and all of the pleasure parts are quite close together. How do we keep the butt bugs where they belong? Here are a few strategies for avoiding contamination (and the possible urinary infections that can result). Try using different hands for front and back. Gloves are a great help as they can be removed after anal play. Similarly, use condoms for anal sex then remove before vaginal contact. Dental dams work great for analingus (and prevent the giver from getting other potential infections.) What to do if you’ve used a body part for anal play and now want to employ it on the vulva? Go take a break and have a good wash.

Is the Standard Advice Useful?

In addition to doing our best to keep the bacteria segregated, we can also decrease their opportunity to flourish. The standard advice of peeing before and after sex, maintaining good hydration and using generous lube can help reduce the risk of infection, should bacteria be inadvertently transferred from back to front.

However, these measures will often be inadequate to prevent an infection, especially if the bacterial load is substantial and the environment welcomes the invaders. Inflamed tissue leads to more adherence, increasing the risk of infection if bacteria have to have been accidentally introduced. An inflamed urethra is more susceptible to infection, but only if there’s a cause of infection, that is, the presence of anal microbes. If there’s no bacteria than you only have inflammation, which is still irritating and can be painful but is likely to resolve without treatment.

It certainly makes sense to stay away from irritants to prevent inflammation and irritation with the concomitant increased susceptibility to infection. Irritants can include friction, spermicides, feminine hygiene products and for some women, certain types of lubricants. Also, if the woman is not adequately aroused and adequately lubricated, penetration can cause irritation, which make her more likely to be unable to fend off bacteria. The health of the women can also be an underlying or co-existent factor.

aloeFor sexual lubricants I strongly advise natural lubricant products, like aloe-based Aloe Cadabra or Good Clean Love (water-soluble and latex-compatible) or coconut oil (NOT latex-compatible). If you’re using condoms, extra lubrication is strongly advised. Also, lubricants are very helpful for intercourse with circumcised men since the lack of the foreskin itself increases friction. The week before menstruation, the post-partum and post-menopause phases of a woman’s life are times that the genitals drier and more fragile. Personally, I think extra lube is pleasure-enhancing at any time, even for women with abundant natural juice.

In addition, unsweetened cranberry juice (liquid or concentrate capsules), Vitamin C and a variety of herbs such as Uva Ursi can naturally kill bacteria. Their use can help in prevention efforts.

Female Ejaculation Prevents UTIs

Finally, I have found that women who ejaculate rarely get UTIs. While peeing after sex may help reduce the number of bacteria, and lessen the chances of getting an infection, the actual flow of fluid through the urethra is only mildly helpful because bacteria adhere to cells. That’s why when you have a UTI and are urinating frequently, all that peeing doesn’t cure the infection. You can’t pee out all those sticky little bacteria. Yet, anecdotally, for myself, in my clinical practice and my teaching, I’ve discovered that abundant ejaculation seems to significantly or even completely prevent urinary infections. (Plus excellent sexual hygiene, of course.) I have a theory that female ejaculate is anti-microbial—I think it’s Mother’s Nature’s UTI prevention strategy.

No More UTIs!

Urinary tract infections are awful, painful and can have dramatic impacts on our sex lives. Some basic knowledge and simple measures can easily be put to use to prevent them once we understand where they come from and how to thwart them. Great sexual hygiene and learning to work with the body’s natural defenses can stop this common problem in its tracks and keep badly behaving bacteria from colonizing our urinary tracts as well.


Want to learn how to female ejaculate (or help your partner learn to do so)? Take the online course!

ROLC_FE_March 2016_V4-HeaderThe Learnable Art of Female Ejaculation

Three Online Classes, Supporting Texts and Videos, ‘Home Play’ Assignments, and More


 

Discover the Source of Female Ejaculation

Nectar of Life

In ancient India, female ejaculate was known as sacred Amrita or the Nectar of Life. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, it’s called White Moon Flower Medicine. Western science is beginning to catch up with this ancient wisdom, but while there is more research then previously, we still lack a consensus about the existence of many of the structures that make up the whole female genitalia and the process of female ejaculation.

The Erectile Network

Women have a network of interconnected structures that are all made of erectile tissue. I call it the Erectile Network. The Erectile Network is a matrix of structures that includes all three parts of the clitoris, the paired vestibular bulbs, the perineal sponge and the urethral sponge. Women can become aroused and orgasmic by stimulating any of these structures (or in many other non-genital ways as well) but, in general the best arousal and orgasms happen when all of these structures are thoroughly stimulated.

Erectile Equality

Pound for pound, inch for inch the female erectile network contains the same amount of erectile tissue as a penis. Erectile tissue is mostly composed of erectile capillaries, which are tiny specialized blood vessels that have the capacity to fill with blood. This is engorgement which is what causes erectile tissue to swell, become harder and more sensitive.

splashing-164171_1280The Super Soaker Sponge

One of the structures in the network is the urethral sponge (aka the female prostate since it’s analogous to the male prostate). The urethral sponge is a tube that surrounds the tube of the urethra – think of it like a roll of paper towels surrounding the inner cardboard tube. It’s located above the roof of the vagina. The bottom of the tube is what is currently (and incorrectly) being referred to as the G-Spot.

The urethral sponge is comprised of both erectile and glandular tissue. The glands are the Paraurethral Glands (aka the Skene’s Glands). They’re tiny tubular structures that are enmeshed in the erectile capillaries — think of them like the hair roots of a plant threaded throughout the soil of the erectile tissue. The tubular glands end in about thirty openings along the urethra, with two slightly larger ducts just inside or just outside the urethral orifice. In other words, the glandular tubules empty into the urethral canal. In some women, there are additional openings along the sides of the vaginal vestibule.

These glands are the source of female ejaculate. The fluid originates in the circulatory system. The watery part of the blood, the plasma diffuses through the wall of the capillaries, enters the glandular tubule, mixes with the products of the gland and then emerges into the urethra. From there it can either emerge from the urethral opening or back-up into the bladder.

More Ejaculate Info

Female ejaculation is the expulsion of that fluid in a drip, gush or squirt. It can be a few drops, a small puddle or a huge flood. In fact, since the original source of the liquid is the circulatory system, there’s a huge fluid reservoir and women can continue to make fluid and have repeated and profuse amounts of ejaculate.

Women may squirt once or repeatedly, occasionally, sometimes, frequently, or always. Female ejaculation doesn’t always accompany orgasm. It can happen with high level arousal although for many women it does commonly happen with orgasm.

rain-1563957_1920Ejaculate is not urine, although it spurts out from the urethra. That’s the same hole pee comes out of, so it’s understandable that people might think it’s urine. But it’s not yellow, doesn’t smell like pee, doesn’t have the same chemical make-up as urine (no urea, no nitric acid). That’s because it’s not urine and doesn’t originate from the bladder. The fluid does contain Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) and Prostatic Acid Phosphatase just as the male prostate fluid does.

Amrita Isn’t Lube

Is it the same as vaginal lubrication? No. vaginal lubrication comes from the inner walls of the vagina and it’s slick and slippery. Ejaculate comes from the paraurethral glands, emerges from the urethral opening and it’s watery.

Natural AND Learnable

While some women are natural ejaculators, it’s a learnable skill and any woman can learn to do it. It’s not required. This is a totally optional skill. I will say though that having ejaculatory orgasms is a mind-boggling, intense and goddess-like experience, so it may be something that you want to learn to do! Being a gushing goddess (or being with a gushing goddess) is glorious!


Read More Blog Posts

BE VULVA WISE: What Does That Mean? “Read more about the erectile network and radical genital anatomy from your personal anatomy geek!”

Is there Or Is There Not A G-Spot? “Confusion Still Reigns – Clear It Up Now!”

G-Spot Reality Check “Is There or Is There Not A G-Spot?”

The Missing Female Pleasure Parts “The Search for Buried Pleasure”


Read the Book

Women’s Anatomy of Arousal — Secret Maps to Buried Pleasure to see more detailed images of these structures, to learn more about all the parts that women really have and the amazing things they can learn to do with them.

Take An Online Course

Another way to learn is to ‘attend’ (watch) any of these recorded Online Courses:


 

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Do Women Really Have a G-Spot?

Yes, women do have a wonderful internal place that responds to the right kind of stimulation, at the right time — I just don’t call it a g-spot. Find out what it is.

Also, check out this blog post: G-Spot Reality Check.